Paved With Gold: The Street Child's Tale

by Holly Tonks

“Morning Chronicle! Get your Morning Chronicle here!” Victorian London. A Newspaper Boy eagerly awaits the latest instalment of London Labour and the London Poor by Henry Mayhew. Henry and his brother Augustus Mayhew toured the streets of London during the late 1840s interviewing the people who lived and worked on the streets. Paved with Gold focuses on the plight of the children – introducing us to such real-life characters as the Crossing Sweep, the Pickpocket and the Watercress Girl; “I ain’t never seen no children cry – there ain’t no use”. Blending puppetry and verbatim theatre, the interviews are entwined with the Newspaper Boy's story to tell of the glimmers of hope and tragedy genuinely experienced by these children. Suitable for ages 9 and upwards. Sponsored by the Everyman Theatre Education Dept. and the Heritage Lottery Fund.

 

Out of the Mist

Jenny Wren Productions in association with the Royal National Lifeboat Institution present

Out of the Mist

by Alan Tyson Parabola Arts Centre, Cheltenham Ladies College 'Time was when seafarers’ lives were in the hands of God… but beyond all human aid.’
Based on true events, Out of the Mist dramatizes the history of the RNLI. A tale of pluck, poignancy and peril on the seas.
A tribute to, and in aid of, the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.

Oliver Twist

By Jeremy Brock

‘The scene, the workhouse; the time, night; and the place, that cruel hole where miserable drabs gave birth... A boy was born there… I speak of one named Oliver Twist.’ An innocent boy falls in with a gang of ruffians in a dog-eat-dog world… but enough about the actors! Dickens’ classic tale of poverty and pick-pocketing, privilege and prosperity is given the Jenny Wren treatment, as a small but perfectly formed cast unravel the secrets of Oliver’s past, portraying all the colourful characters he meets on his perilous path. Expect laughter and tears, surprises and fears; but not Lionel Bart’s musical – we can’t sing! Previous Jenny Wren Productions include A Child in the Forest, Around the World in 80 Days, The Pickwick Papers and last year’s Brief Encounter. What’s that you say? You want some MORE…? Well, look no further – ‘Oliver’s in town’. Praise for previous Jenny Wren Producons: “Humorous and poignant, comic and tragic… a great night out” Joyce Matthews, Gloucestershire Echo In the open-air – please bring a chair or blanket.

Funny Boy

Jenny Wren Productions return to the Everyman Studio Theatre with Funny Boy, a new play developed from last year’s The Pygmalion Project.
Set in 1969, in the stable of a large country house, this is a modern take on an old story about status, society and success. Mother and son sneak separately to the stable for a secret cigarette. The stable is home to a promising young racehorse, cared for by two women who love and cherish him as the mother loves and cherishes the son. Many hopes lie on the son and the horse, but can they be fulfilled? Is success dependent on fame and breeding? “I'm the greatest star, I am, by far, but no one knows it.”

Dr Korczak's Example

“If it weren’t for you, Dr Korczak, and for the home, I would never have known that there are honest people in the world. That I can tell the truth. That there is justice.” Jenny Wren Productions return to the Studio with the haunting tale of Dr Janusz Korczak and the children he cared for. Korczak was a good man who ran an orphanage in the Jewish ghetto in Warsaw, amidst the horror and injustice of the Nazi occupation. He influenced not only the lives of hundreds of orphans, but his writings also became the basis for the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Based on a true story, David Greig’s beautiful play will uplift and inspire, just as Korczak did, even through the terrible reality of their situation. With its use of Brechtian techniques and puppetry, this production is ideal for secondary school pupils, but thought provoking for all. “I’ve trained them well. For a perfect world. How will they survive this one?”

Cider With Rosie

By Laurie Lee, adapted by Nick Darke “Never to be forgotten, that first long secret drink of golden fire, juice of those valleys and of that time, wine of wild orchards, of russet summer, of plump red apples and Rosie’s burning cheeks…”
Be transported back to the Gloucestershire of the 1920s and ‘30s and get lost in Laurie Lee’s tales of a village childhood. Recapture the magic of long summer days, the village school, carol singing in the snow, whispers of murder, and of course sharing that bottle of cider with a girl called Rosie… "In the spirited hands of director Jenny Wicks, and with a very strong, attractive cast, Nick Darke's sensitive adaptation of Cider with Rosie brought out all of the contrasts of the much-loved novel by Laurie Lee, arousing hilarity, surprises and moments of poignancy in the audience." Kathy Davies, Stroud News and Journal, 27.07.05. "We drove away dreaming of 'russet summer, of plump red apples and Rosie's burning cheeks'." Donald Hollins, the Gloucestershire Echo

Burke and Hare

How many times can one actor get killed during one performance? Find out in this brand new comedy based on the infamous tale of William Burke and William Hare. The murderers who sold their victims' corpses for anatomical research get the Jenny Wren treatment - three actors playing all parts and maybe, just maybe, stretching the truth. Quite a lot. In fact, Burke and Hare has a hysterical, rather than historical, basis. From the company that brought you The Hound of the Baskervilles, Oliver Twist and, most recently, Twelfth Night, expect many murders, many men called William and many more accents.
“You know you’re in for a treat with Jenny Wren” – Cotswold Life